Employment, Publications and Talks

Contact me directly for more information about my publications or talks, or to request a full CV including in-progress publications, grants, training and academic service.

Twitter: @NatCutter.
Email: nat [at] cutters [dot] org.

Employment History

2019-present: Sessional Tutor and Guest Lecturer, Medieval, Early Modern and Economic History, University of Melbourne

2019: Research Assistant/Intern, Digital Studio, Faculty of Arts, University of Melbourne, Digital Studio Graduate Internship Project Bunjil’s Biik: Mapping the Ancestral Country of the Boonwurrung

2018-19: Research Assistant/Project Manager, School of Culture and Communication, Faculty of Arts, University of Melbourne, ARC Linkage Project Creative Convergence: Enhancing Impact in Regional Theatre for Young People

2017-18: Research Assistant/Project Officer, Digital Studio, Faculty of Arts, University of Melbourne

Publications

‘Peace with Pirates? Maghrebi Maritime Combat, Diplomacy, and Trade in English Periodical News, 1622-1714’, Humanities 8, 4 (2019), article no. 179, special issue ‘Pirates in English Literature’ edited by Claire Jowitt and Manushag Powell. Available at: http://go.unimelb.edu.au/j85r

‘Turks, Moors, Deys and Kingdoms: North African Diversity in English News before 1700’, Melbourne Historical Journal 46 (2018): 61-84. Winner, Greg Dening Memorial Prize (2018) and SHAPS Fellows Group Annual History Essay Prize (2019). Available at: http://go.unimelb.edu.au/x85r

Review of Gary K. Waite, Jews and Muslims in Seventeenth-Century Discourse: From Religious Enemies to Allies and Friends (New York and Abingdon: Routledge, 2019), Parergon 37, 1 (2020): 295-97. Available at: http://go.unimelb.edu.au/44zr

Review of Patricia Akhimie, Shakespeare and the Cultivation of Difference: Race and Conduct in the Early Modern World (New York and Abingdon: Routledge, 2018), Parergon 36, 1 (2019): 179-80. Available at: http://go.unimelb.edu.au/r85r

Forthcoming Publications

‘“Grieved in my soul that I suffered you to depart from me”: Isolation and Community in the English Houses at Tunis and Tripoli, 1679-1686’, forthcoming for Heather Dalton, ed., Keeping Family in an Age of Long Distance Trade, Imperial Expansion and Exile 1550-1850 (Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2020)

Review of Jorun Poettering, Migrating Merchants: Trade, Nation, and Religion in Seventeenth-Century Hamburg and Portugal (Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter, 2019), Parergon, 37, 2 (2020)

‘Between Captives and Consuls: Searching for the “Little English” of Barbary’  (Greg Dening Memorial Lecture), Melbourne Historical Journal 47, 1 (2019)

Digital Projects

Medieval and Early Modern Orients, AHRC/University of Liverpool,https://memorients.com/ (founding contributor)

Boonwurrung Songlines: Mapping the Ancestral Country of the Boonwurrung (2019), Bunjil’s Biik/University of Melbourne (research, data management, online map production), http://go.unimelb.edu.au/wk8r 

Circuit: Mapping Theatre Performance in Victoria (2018), ARC/University of Melbourne, https://circuit.unimelb.edu.au (data collection and entry, contribution to creative development and project management)

‘The Overland Letter’ (2017), University of Melbourne Archives, http://blogs.unimelb.edu.au/archives/the-overland-letter/ (sole author)

The Victorian Trades Hall: An Archival History (2015), University of Melbourne Omeka exhibition, http://go.unimelb.edu.au/8m6r (lead writer and exhibition curator)

Prizes

For ‘Turks, Moors, Deys, and Kingdoms: North African Diversity in English News before 1700’:
2019 SHAPS Fellows’ Group Annual History Essay Prize, University of Melbourne
2018 Greg Dening Memorial Prize, University of Melbourne

Conferences and Talks

‘“For Which I Refer You To The Bearer”: News, Connection and Trade in Seventeenth-Century Tunis and the Mediterranean’, Old and New Uses of the Oceans, 8th IMHA International Congress of Maritime History, University of Porto, 29 June-2 July 2021 [rescheduled from 30 June-3 July 2020 due to COVID-19]

‘Exile in Barbary: Making Sense of Protestant Life in the Seventeenth-Century Maghreb’, Society for Renaissance Studies Biennial Conference, University of East Anglia, Norwich, 29 June-1 July 2021 [rescheduled from 7-9 July 2020 due to COVID-19]

‘The Freshest Advices from Barbary: Maghrebi News and Experiences in British Expatriate Letters, 1660-1705’, Britain and the World Conference, University of Plymouth, June 2021 [rescheduled from 17-19 June 2020 due to COVID-19]

‘A Christian (in Habit) from Head to Foot: British expatriates, everyday life, and cultural fluidity in the Ottoman Maghreb, 1660-1710’, Habit in the Long Eighteenth Century, University College London, 20-21 February 2021

‘Christian Charity or Captive Market? The Commerce of Barbary Redemptions, 1677-1700’, Dark Enlightenments, XVII David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies, 1-4 December 2020 (scheduled)

‘Gardens, Drunkards, Parties and Plague: British Expatriates and the Good Life in Barbary, c.1680-1700’, CMRS Annual Symposium, Monash University, 2 October 2020 [rescheduled from 24 April 2020 due to COVID-19]

‘British Expatriates, Periodical News and the Transformation of “Barbary” in Restoration England’, History Brown Bag Seminar Series, University of Melbourne, 26 September 2020

‘Pirates or Corsairs? How English Periodicals Framed News of the Maghreb, 1622-1714’, invited talk at SHAPS Fellows Group, University of Melbourne, 26 August 2020 [postponed from 25 March due to COVID-19]

‘The First Misery of Barbary: Plague, Medicine, Recovery and Death for British Expatriates in the Ottoman Maghreb, 1660-1710’, Reconsidering Illness and Recovery in the Early Modern World Online Conference, Durham University/Oxford University Press/Yale University Press, 18-19 August

‘Consuls, Captives and Barbary Corsairs: The Maghreb in British News, 1622-1714’,  The Historian, The Iconoclast, Early Modern Quonference, 26 June 2020

‘Grateful Fresh Advices and Random Dark Relations: Maghrebi News and Experiences in British Expatriate Letters, 1660-1710’, Medieval & Early Modern Studies Festival, University of Kent, 12-13 June 2020

‘The West and the West: Britain, Morocco and Political Equivalence, c. 1600-1690’, Western Civilisation in the Twenty-First Century, University of Adelaide, 20-21 February 2020

‘Between Captives and Consuls: Searching for the “Little English” of Barbary’, invited talk as part of Listening Across Boundaries: Greg Dening and the Art of History-ing, theAnnual Greg Dening Memorial Lecture, with Fallon Mody and Henry Reese, University of Melbourne, 15 October 2019

‘Peace with Pirates: Maghrebi Warfare and Diplomacy in English Periodical News, 1622-1714’
– The Problem of Piracy: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Plunder by Sea across the World from the Ancient to the Modern, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, 24-26 June 2019
– Medievalism Transformed: Crime and Punishment from the Medieval to the Early Modern and the Neo-Gothic, Bangor University, 21 June 2019
– Medieval & Early Modern Studies Festival, University of Kent, Canterbury, 14-15 June 2019

‘“Grieved in my soul that I suffered you to depart from me”: Community and Isolation in the English Houses at Tunis and Tripoli, 1679-86’, Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Seminar Series, Monash University, Melbourne, 3 May 2019

‘Turks, Moors, Deys and Kingdoms: North African Diversity in the Stuart Periodical Press’, Boundaries, Categories, Horizons: ANZAMEMS Twelfth Biennial Conference, University of Sydney, 6-8 February 2019

‘Monopolising Morocco: Monopolies and Anti-Monopolists in Early Modern England’, Anti-Monopoly Workshop, University of Melbourne, 24 August 2018